IT'S XIAOTIME!

Naglilingkod sa Diyos at sa Bayan sa pagtuturo ng Kasaysayan

Tag: tarlac

WHO IS THAT POKEMÓN? F. Tañedo and Other Street Names in Tarlac City (To Celebrate Tarlac City Fiesta, 20 January 2013)

Michael Charleston “Xiao” B. Chua [1]

ISLAND STUDIO classic shot of Mt. Pinatubo's first major eruption as seen from F. Tañedo Street in Tarlac, Tarlac, 12 June 1991.

ISLAND STUDIO classic shot of Mt. Pinatubo’s first major eruption as seen from F. Tañedo Street in Tarlac, Tarlac, 12 June 1991.

(First published at Tarlac Star Monitor, 22-28 May 2012, 5)

Street names are part of our everyday lives.  Despite that, or even because of that, we just pass them by day by day oblivious of whom or what those street names represent.  But street names reflect history.  That is why one of the best history books on the City of Manila is Luning B. Ira and Isagani Medina’s The Streets of Manila.[2]

Asking the question “Just who is F. Tañedo?” led me to writing a paper about the hero to whom the main street of the city was named.[3]  In the process of my research, Dr. Lino Dizon gave me a treasure—a copy of an old article by Tarlac micro (local) historian Vicente Catu published in The Monitor on 4 February 1973.

In “How Tarlac Streets Got Their Names,” Catu enumerated the national and provincial heroes which are honored in poblacion street names.  I will reprint his article in italics and annotate or add a thing or two to the data that he presented to update it for this write-up.

F. Tañedo Street.  Photo by Xiao Chua.

F. Tañedo Street. Photo by Xiao Chua.

F. TAÑEDO STREET (the poblacion main road) named after Gen. Francisco Tañedo, a native son of Tarlac, who died a martyr’s death at the hands of Spanish soldiers on charges of underground activities during the Philippine Revolution.  Hailing from the pioneer clan of Tarlac town, Don Kikoy was elected lieutenant for the colonial government in 1889 and served for two years.  He co-founded the first masonic lodge in Tarlac, the Logia Filipino Gran Nacional Orient, and was one of the leaders of the Katipunan in the province (Tarlac being one of the first eight provinces to revolt against Spain in 1896).  A conflict with a guardia civil led to his arrest, and when he refused to implicate fellow revolutionaries and mason, he was tortured to death.  According to letters found by Dr. Lino Dizon, his death was the reason why Makabulos continued to fight the Spaniards despite Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo’s surrender at Biak-na-Bato.

ANCHETA STREET (fronting the Alice theater) named after local hero Francisco (sic – Candido) Ancheta of Tarlac, Tarlac.

C. SANTOS STREET (fronting the Rural Bank of Tarlac) named after revolutionary leader Ciriaco Santos, the father of Don Joaquin Santos and grandfather of …Hilario Santos.

HILARIO STREET (fronting Ramos Hospital) is named after revolutionary leader Procopio Hilario Sr., and father of the late Procopio Hilario Jr., of Tarlac, Tarlac.  Procopio Hilario was the brother of Don Tiburcio Hilario, the brains of the revolution in Pampanga.  He married F. Tañedo’s sister Carmen.  Together with his brother-in-law, Francisco Macabulos, Candido Ancheta and Ciriaco Santos, they spearheaded the Philippine Revolution in Tarlac province.  For this, he was executed by the Spaniards.  His son, Procopio Hilario, Jr., became a beloved school teacher described as “very kind, simple and not greedy,”[4] and one of his grandchildren, Socorro Hilario-Timbol, became directress of the Tarlac First Baptist Church School (TFBCS).  I am proud to be his distant relative.

ESPINOSA STREET (fronting KB Sizzlers, near the Tarlac plazuela) is named after Don Porfirio Espinosa, former town president of Tarlac Town (1908-1909).

RIZAL STREET (fronting the Tarlac City Hall) is named after Dr. José Rizal, the national hero, who during his lifetime was a frequent visitor of the Tarlac masons.  On the same street once stood the house of Don Evaristo Puno (municipal president of Tarlac from 1885 to 1886) where Rizal stayed on 27 June 1892.

DEL PILAR STREET (at the back of the Old Tarlac Public Market, fronting Botica Sto. Cristo, Tarlac Ice Plant) is named after Marcelo H. del Pilar, the great reformist.

LUNA STREET (fronting the Sto. Cristo Elementary School) is named after Gen. Antonio Luna, the over-all commander of the Central Luzon Revolutionary Troops – 208,000 men.  It is now more popularly ascribed to the general’s brother Juan Luna, the Philippines’ National Painter whose masterpiece, the Spoliarium, won the gold medal in the Madrid Exposition of Fine Arts in 1884.

MABINI STREET (fronting the Tarlac Electric Plant) is named after Apolinario Mabini, the known Sublime Paralytic and Prime Minister of Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo’s Government who never collected salaries in return for his services to the country.

BURGOS STREET (fronting Kentucky Fried Chicken, near the Tarlac plazuela) is named after Father José Burgos, one of the three Filipino priests who were garroted at the Luneta on the dawn of February 17, 1892 on charges of complicity with the Cavite Mutiny.

ZAMORA STREET (fronting Kent Lumber, Iglesia ni Cristo, Tarlac Central Elementary School) named after Fr. Jacinto Zamora, also one of the three priests to have died in the garrote in connection with the Cavite Mutiny.

MACARTHUR HIGHWAY (fronting Metrotown Mall, Siesta) the national highway named after Gen. Douglas MacArthur, the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers in the Pacific Theater of World War II.

ROMULO BOULEVARD (fronting the Tarlac State University, Diwa ng Tarlak) is named after Don Gregorio Romulo, Camiling Municipal President from 1906 to 1907, Governor of the province from 1910 to 1914, and father to the Little Giant, Gen. Carlos P. Romulo, President of the United Nations General Assembly and President of the University of the Philippines, among other things.

AQUINO BOULEVARD (fronting new Tarlac Public Market, Uniwide) reclaimed from the Tarlac dike, it was named after former Tarlac governor and former senator Benigno “Ninoy” S. Aquino, Jr., who became a world icon of resistance against the Marcos dictatorship and died a martyr’s death on 21 August 1983.  Recently, the boulevard was extended from Cut-Cut I to Carangian.

HOSPITAL DRIVE (fronting the Central Luzon’s Doctor’s Hospital) the road leading to the Tarlac Provincial Hospital, the first provincial hospital in the Philippines.  The former University of the Philippines Tarlac Campus is now the site of the delapidated provincial guest house.  Facing it is another hospital, the Central Luzon Doctor’s Hospital.

MACABULOS DRIVE (fronting the Tarlac City Post Office, Development Bank of the Philippines) named after the Liberator of Tarlac Province during the Philippine Revolution, Francisco Macabulos of La Paz town, who continued the struggle despite Pres. Emilio Aguinaldo’s truce with the Spaniards in Biak-na-Bato in 1897.  Another road, the San Vicente Northern Road fronting Camp Macabulos is erroneously ascribed the same name.

The listing here is just preliminary.  Dr. Rodrigo Sicat of the Center for Tarlaqueño Studies had already written extensive papers on the toponyms or the origins of place-names in the province.  I hope other scholars and enthusiasts would expand on what we had written.  Further studies could deal with other street names or place-names or in depth research on the lives and sacrifices of many of our local heroes who just exist to us as trivial street names.


[1]               Mr. Michael Charleston “Xiao” Briones Chua, 29, is currently an Assistant Professor of History at De Sa Salle University and a Ph.D. Anthropology student at the University of the Philippines, Diliman, where he also taught for three years and finished his BA and MA in History.  He is governor-at-large of the Philippine Historical Association and a member of the International Order of the Knights of Rizal.  He appears regularly as historical commentator on national television.  He is a native of Tarlac City.

[2]               Luning B. Ira and Isagani R. Medina, Streets of Manila (Quezon City:  GCF Books, 1977).

[3]               Michael Charleston B. Chua, “F. Tañedo St., P. Hilario St.:  Ang Paglimot at Pag-alala sa mga Bayani ng Himagsikang 1896 sa Tarlac,” in Bernie S. de Vera, Rizal P. Valenzuela and Michael Charleston B. Chua, Dakilang Tarlakin (Quezon City:  Bahay Saliksikan ng Tarlakin, 2007).  Originally submitted to Dr. Jaime B. Veneracion as a paper for Kasaysayan 207 (History of the Philippine Revolution), first semester, 2005-2006 at the University of the Philippine in Diliman.  Presented in the sympoisum “Bulilit Kasaysayan: Mga Pag-aaral Ukol Sa Himagsikan at Mikro-Kasaysayan”, Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Maragondon, Cavite, 6 October 2005.

[4]               Bor De Jesus, Interview, 18 September 2005.

TARLAC, TARLAC: Capital of the Philippine Republic, 1899 (To Celebrate Tarlac City Fiesta, 20 January 2013)

Published by Tarlac Star Monitor:  http://tarlacstarmonitor.com/tarlac-star-monitor-vol-5-no-5/tarlac-tarlac-capital-of-the-philippine-republic-1899-to-celebrate-tarlac-city-fiesta-20-january-2012/

The Tarlac Church, site of the 1899 Philippine Revolutionary Congress (Lino Dizon Collection http://www.oocities.org/balen_net/cabecera.htm)

 TARLAC, TARLAC:  Capital of the Philippine Republic, 1899[1] 

Michael Charleston “Xiao” B. Chua[2] 

Department of History, De La Salle University Manila

I grew up in a time when television news reporting in the Philippines was Manila-centric and I felt that our province was insignificant, despite a Tarlaqueño president, because it was rarely cited in TV Patrol and I even felt that when Ernie Baron gives the thypoon warnings, all Central Luzon provinces would be warned but not even Tarlac has a storm signal.  Even history textbooks seldom mention significant events in Tarlac despite it being one of the first eight provinces who joined the Philippine Revolution in 1896.

Years later as a student of history, while doing research at the UP Main Library, I stumbled over a very old booklet by a Tarlac school teacher, Mrs. Aquilina de Santos entitled Tarlak’s Historic Heritage.[3]  It outlines the legacy of the province in the national history, specifically when it became seat of the Philippine Republic under Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo from 21 June to 12 November, 1899.  I also read the scholarly work of our foremost historian Lino Dizon on the Tarlac Revolutionary Congress.[4]   In their writings, and other historical documents I learned that if there was TV Patrol back then, Tarlac could have dominated the news because as capital of the republic, a few significant things happened here that our national textbooks seem to reduce in a sentence or a footnote.

After the fall of Aguinaldo’s capital, Malolos, Bulacan, to the Americans, the Philippine Revolutionary Congress reconvened on 14 July 1899.  Seats for provinces not represented have to be filled in by Luzon people, a number of them Tarlaqueños, such as:  Don Jose Espinosa (Tayabas), Servillano Aquino (Samar), Marciano Barrera and Luis Navarro (Leyte), Alfonso Ramos (Palaos Islands), Capt. Lazaro Tañedo (Zamboanga), Gavino Calma (Romblon), and Francisco Makabulos (Cebu).

The Altar-Mayor of the Tarlac Cathedral with the prominent statue of Apung Basti (San Sebastian). 1930s. (Lino Dizon Collection http://www.oocities.org/balen_net/cabecera.htm)

 

Ten days after the convening of the Congress, an article appeared in the revolutionary paper La Independencia criticizing the Tarlac Revolutionary Congress.  The article entitled “Algo Para Congreso” (Something for Congress), signed by PARALITICO, pointed out that the Congress was a failure.  No less than Apolinario Mabini, Sublime Paralytic and Brains of the Revolution, wrote the article in Rosales, Pangasinan on 19 July 1899.  He pointed out that the Congress, as convened in Tarlac, was not even a representative of the people; that the elections for Congress should not have been held because the Aguinaldo government was fighting a war; and that a declaration of principles is much more suitable in a revolution instead of using a constitution copied from French and South American Republics, which were made in times of peace.

Yet, despite Mabini’s criticism and the Philippine-American War at the background, the Congress enacted laws.  By doing so, according to University of the Philippines constitutional historian Sulpicio Guevarra, they “marvelously succeeded in producing order out of chaos.”  The Tarlac Revolutionary Congress convened in San Sebastian Cathedral in Tarlac, Tarlac.  This humble sanctuary became a witness to the First Philippine Republic realizing its fullest potential as a government, despite limiting circumstances.

Some significant decrees issued in Tarlac were the prescription of fees for civil and canonical marriages (28 June), the prohibition of merchant vessels flying the American flag from territories held by the Philippine Republic (24 July), the provision for the registration of foreigners (31 July), the organization of the Supreme Court and the inferior courts (15 September), and the promulgation of the General Orders of the Army (12 November).  The latter was even issued a day after the fall of the Aguinaldo government.

Another one of the early decrees of Aguinaldo in Tarlac was that on the establishment of the Bureau of Paper Money, 30 June 1899.  In the printing press of Zacarias Fajardo the first paper money were printed—the one peso denomination, followed later by the five-peso denomination.   Paper bills of two, five and twenty pesos were also printed.  For the coins, a maestranza or mint was established on the building of the Smith, Bell, & Co., at a property owned by Don Mauricio Ilagan in Gerona, Tarlac.

Another one of the early decrees of Aguinaldo in Tarlac was the clemency granted to the Spanish prisoners who defended the Baler Church, 30 June 1899.  Fifty Spanish soldiers, popularly known in Spain as “Los Ultimos de Filipinos,” made their last stand inside Baler Church.  Filipinos held constant siege of the church, yet despite deaths, diseases, starvation and loneliness, the Spaniards held out for 337 days.  On 2 June 1899, the 33 surviving Spanish troops surrendered, Filipinos received them shouting, “Amigos, amigos!”  Aguinaldo recognized the bravery of these men, and decreed that they should not be treated as enemies but as brothers.  They were issued safe conduct passes and were allowed to go back to their Madre España.  The event, which manifested the bravery of the Spaniards, the benevolence of the Filipinos, and the enduring friendship between two sovereign nations more than a former colonizer and colonized, is being celebrated today as Philippine-Spanish Friendship Day on the date of the Aguinaldo Proclamation from Tarlac.

Not only was the Philippine Republic the first democratic republic in Asia, we also had the first Filipino University in Tarlac.  The Philippine Revolution of 1896 interrupted the schooling of most young Filipinos, many of them working in the Philippine government.  This can be attributed as the reason why education was top priority by the First Philippine Republic despite the fact that the times were difficult.  As mandated in a decree dated 19 October 1898, the Universidad Cientifico-Literaria de Filipinas (Scientific and Literary University of the Philippines) was established in Malolos, Bulacan.  When Malolos fell to the Americans, the schools have to close down.  As mandated in a decree dated 9 August 1899, the university, together with the Burgos Institute (secondary school), was re-established in Tarlac.  The Tarlac Convent beside the San Sebastian Cathedral was used as the school building.  But because of the hostilities around Tarlac, all these plans were disrupted once again.  On 29 September 1899, the first and last graduation rites for the Literary University were held, the diplomas signed by Aguinaldo himself.

On 23 September 1899, the Imprenta Nacional (owned by Tarlaqueño Zacarias Fajardo) came out with the booklet Reseña Veridica de la Revolucion Filipina with Emilio Aguinaldo as its titular author.  An English version, the True Version of the Philippine Revolution, was also published translated by Marciano Rivera and corrected by a certain Mr. Duncan, probably for American readers.  Aside from being the very first work on the Philippine Revolution ever published, the work also condemned the atrocities of American expeditionary forces in the Philippines.  For Carlos P. Romulo, this added significance to an already important work because it presaged My Lai and other atrocities committed by American Forces during the Vietnam War by over half a century.

On 23 October 1899, the ex-communicated Filipino priest, Fr. Gregorio Aglipay, convened the Filipino clergy in Paniqui, Tarlac (the site is now part of Anao town) to affirm their common struggle against the Archbishop of Manila, Bernardino Nozaleda, and their common stand that the Holy See in the Vatican should recognize their petitions.  They came out with the Constitutiones Provisionales de la Iglesia Filipina(Provisional Ordinances of the Philippine Church), which “provided temporary regulations for the church in the Philippines due to the exigencies of war.”  This gave the impression that the document is a constitution for a new church.  Some even mistake the event as the founding of the new church, which, by this time, was still yet to happen until Aglipay and Isabelo de los Reyes would severe their ties from Rome and establish the Iglesia Filipina Independiente commonly known as the Aglipayan Church.

Tarlac is the terrain where so many battles were fought between the Philippine Army and the superior American Forces.  Yet despite the war that was being fought, it was socially alive during the brief stint there of the First Philippine Republic.  Fiestas and dinners drew crowds.  One such function happened on 2 November 1899, a formal banquet was held at the Teatro de Tarlac hosted by the Asamblea de Mujeresspearheaded by the president’s wife, First Lady Hilaria del Rosario Aguinaldo.

But these would all be over in days time.  By 11 November 1899, Gen. Arthur Macarthur was entering Tarlac Province.  But the Filipinos won’t let him through without a fight.  The 300 to 400 troops under the command of Gen. Makabulos, backed-up by Gen. Servillano Aquino’s brigade, tried to stop the Americans along the Bamban-Concepcion road.  But Macarthur’s 3,000 strong army was too much for them.  When night came, the Americans already had Bamban, Capas and Concepcion.

The next day, Gen. Macarthur and his troops entered Tarlac town, drenched in rain.  They have captured the seat of government, but Aguinaldo and his men were nowhere in sight.  They had fled.  In a few days, the Philippine Army would be disbanded.  For Nick Joaquin, this was the collapse of the Filipino nation, “The Republic had fallen.”

The Philippine Republic in Tarlac was not a mere footnote in history, for in that brief stint of the Aguinaldo government in the province, so many things were tried to be accomplished despite the limiting circumstances of the war.  Economic and educational institutions were raised up to be the foundation of government.  In Tarlac, the republic showed the world that we Filipinos could govern ourselves at that early stage.  Tarlac, therefore, is as historically significant as Malolos, Bulacan.  It is part of the story of our development as a nation, and our government as it is today.

Xiao Chua in front of Apung Basti at the Tarlac Cathedral, November 2011

 

Therefore, it is vital that young Tarlaqueños, as future leaders of our province, should be made aware of their own historic heritage.  As much as they learn the history of our country, our continent and our world in schools, so must be that they learn their province’s local history. To know our past is to know ourselves.  It tells us who we are, how we were and how did we become what we are today.  It also gives us a sense of direction for the future.  Screw people who think that life is all about the money; history gives us a sense of pride, and a sense of identity, that in no way we would feel the emptiness of non-belonging.

[1]               Expurgated and edited version of an undergraduate paper, “A FOOTNOTE IN HISTORY, Tarlac: Seat of Government of the Philippine Republic, 1899,” originally for Kasaysayan (History) 111 under Dr. Ricardo Trota José in the University of the the Philippines at Diliman.  Presented at  the 4th Philippine-Spanish Friendship Day Conference Workshop at the Aurora State College of Technology (ASCOT), Baler, Aurora on 29 July 2006.  It was published as a commentary in the third issue (December 2005) of Alaya:  The Kapampangan Resesarch Journal of The Juan D. Nepomuceno Center for Kapampangan Studies, Holy Angel University, Angeles City.

[2]               Mr. Xiao Chua, 29, is currently an Assistant Professor at the De La Salle University Manila and Ph.D. Anthropology student at the University of the Philippines, Diliman, where he also finished his MA and BA in History.  He is a native of Tarlac City.

[3]               Mrs. Aquilina de Santos, Tarlak’s Historic Heritage (Manila:  Benipayo Press & Photo-Engravers, 1933).

[4]               Lino Lenon Dizon, Francisco Makabulos Soliman:  A Biographical Study of a Local Revolutionary Hero (Tarlac:  Center for Tarlaqueño Studies, 1994); Tarlac And The Revolutionary Landscape (Tarlac:  Center For Tarlaqueño Studies, Tarlac State University/Holy Cross College, 1997); “The Tarlac Revolutionary Congress” in The Tarlac Revolutionary Congress of July 14, 1899:  A Centennial Commemoration (Tarlac City:  Center for Tarlaqueño Studies, Tarlac State University, 1999);  “The Philippine Revolutionary Government, from Malolos to Bayambang (1898-1899)” in Kasaysayan:  Journal of the National Historical Institute, Volume 1, No. 4, Decdember 2001, pp. 1-15.

CPR: Ang Iba’t Ibang Karera ni Carlos P. Romulo

Heneral Carlos P. Romulo, ayudante-de-campo- ni Heneral Douglas MacArthur sa Australis, 1942.  Mula sa Great Lives:  Carlos Romulo.

Heneral Carlos P. Romulo, ayudante-de-campo- ni Heneral Douglas MacArthur sa Australis, 1942. Mula sa Great Lives: Carlos Romulo.

Isang pagpupugay ni Xiao Chua sa iba’t ibang kontribusyon at papel ng kaprobinsya niyang si Carlos P. Romulo sa kasaysayan ng Pilipinas para sa pagdidirwang ng kanyang ika-115 na kaarawan, 14 Enero 1898.

Kilala sa tawag na “Little Giant,” si Carlos P. Romulo ay may taas na kulang-kulang 5.4 lamang ngunit humawak ng matataas na posisyon hindi lamang sa bansa kundi sa pandaigdigang pulitika, sa panahon ng tinatawag na Cold War sa pagitan ng mga kakampi ang Estados Unidos at kakampi ng Unyong Sobyet.  Ngunit malayo pa ang lahat ng ito nang isilang siya sa Camiling, Tarlac noong 14 Enero 1898.  Ang kanyang ama na si Gregorio Romulo ay lumaban sa Digmaang Pilipino-Amerikano ngunit pagkaraang sumuko at naging kaibigan ang isang Major Dalrymple na tumira sa kanilang tahanan.  Siya ang nagturo sa batang si Carlos na maglaro ng baseball at maglangoy.  Dahil dito ang pamilya Romulo ang unang mga Pilipino na nagsalita ng Ingles sa kanilang bayan.  Hindi naglaon, si Gregorio ay nahalal na presidente municipal ng Camiling at matapos nito ay naging Gobernador ng lalawigan ng Tarlac.

Si Goberandor at Gng. Gregorio Romulo, ang mga magulang ni Carlos:  Mula sa Great Lives:  Carlos Romulo.

Si Gobernador at Gng. Gregorio Romulo, ang mga magulang ni Carlos: Mula sa Great Lives: Carlos Romulo.

Naging estudyante ng hayskul sa Tarlac at Maynila at hinasa ang kanyang galing sa pagtatalumpati sa Ingles at nahumaling sa literaturang Ingles.  Nging cub reporter ng Manila Times at pumasok din sa Cablenews—American.  Pumasok siya sa Unibersidad ng Pilipinas noong 1916 ngunit matapos lamang ang dalawang taon ay napili na isa sa maging mga pensionado na pag-aaralin sa Estados Unidos.  Nag-aral siya sa Columbia Univeristy sa New York at nakita ang hindi pagkakapantay-pantay sa Estados Unidos sa usapin ng lahi.  At dahil laging napagkakamalian siyang Tsino o Hapones, nagsagawa siya ng Pagdiriwang ng Araw ni Rizal upang maipakilala ang lahi natin doon.  Sa kanyang pagbabalik sa Maynila noong 1922, sabay-sabay siyang nagturo sa UP, kawaksing patnugot ng Philippines Herald, at pribadong kalihim ng Pangulo ng Senado Manuel L. Quezon.

Si Romulo kasama ang Pagulong Quezon.  Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Si Romulo kasama ang Pagulong Quezon. Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

May panahong nagsulat din siya sa kalabang pahayagan, ang Tribune, ngunit pinakiusapan ni Quezon na bumalik sa Herald bilang tagapaglathala.  Naging katuwang ni Quezon ang mga pahayagan ni Romulo sa pagsusulong ng kanyang mga adhikain lalo na ang pagkakapasa ng Batas Tydings-McDuffie na nagbibigay ng sampung taong sariling panguluhan sa Pilipinas sa ilalim ng Amerika bilang isang Komonwelt bago mabigyan ng ganap na kasarinlan.  Naging Pangulo si Quezon ng Pamahalaang Komonwelt noong 1935 at ginawa niyang tagapayong militar si Hen. Douglas MacArthur.  Si Romulo rin ang isa sa mga kasaping tagapagtatag ng Boy Scouts of the Philippines.  Noong Setyembre 1941, naglakbay si Romulo sa mga kolonya ng Kanluran sa Asya at nakita niya kung paano naghihirap ang mga tao sa mga lugar na ito na nanaisin pa nilang masakop ng mga Hapones na lumalakas noon bilang Kapangyarihang Imperyalista.  Isinulat niya ito sa loob ng 45 artikulo na nalathala sa Amerika at naging dahilan ng pagkakagawad sa kanya ng Pulitzer Prize in Journalism noong 1942.  Ito ang unang pagkakataon na naibigay ito sa isang hindi Amerikano.  Sa pakiusap ni MacArthur ginawang opisyal ng Philippine Army si Romulo, at kinuha rin ng US Army bilang major in charge of press relations.  Sa pagsiklab ng digmaan, nagbigay ng mga brodkast para sa Voice of Freedom mula sa Corregidor at naging malaking tinik sa mga Hapones, nilagyan ng patong ang kanyang ulo.

Ang opisyal na biyograpia ni Carlos Romulo.

Ang opisyal na biyograpia ni Carlos Romulo.

Bago bumagsak ang Bataan sa mga Hapones noong 9 Abril 1942, nakatakas patungong Iloilo at Mindanao bago inilipad patungong Australia.  Doon, siya ay naging aide-de-camp ni Hen. MacArthur.  Nagtungo siya sa Estados Unidos at sinamahan si Pang. Quezon na hinirang siya na Kalihim ng Impormasyon.  Dalawang taon niyang inikot ang Estados Unidos upang magsalita sa ngalan ng mga sundalong Pilipino-Amerikano sa Pilipinas—“Remember Freedom.” Tinawag siyang “Mr. Philippines.”

Si Carlos P. Romulo habang nagtatalumpati noong Dekada 1940.  Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Si Carlos P. Romulo habang nagtatalumpati noong Dekada 1940. Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Nang mamatay si Quezon, ang bagong pangulo na si Sergio Osmeña ay hinirang siya na resident commissioner to the United States.  Sinamahan si MacArthur sa kanyang makasaysayang pagdaong sa Leyte upang bumalik sa Pilipinas noong 20 Oktubre 1944.

Si Heneral Carlos P. Romulo kasama ni Heneral Douglas MacArthur sa kanilang pagdaong sa Leyte, October 20, 1944.

Si Heneral Carlos P. Romulo kasama ni Heneral Douglas MacArthur sa kanilang pagdaong sa Leyte, October 20, 1944.

Matapos ang isang taon, si Romulo ang isa sa lumikha ng charter ng mga Nagkakaisang Bansa o United Nations (UN), at kasama sa mga lumagda nito sa kabila ng katotohanang hindi pa isang ganap na nagsasariling bansa ang Pilipinas.

Si Romulo habang pinipirmahan ang charter ng United Nations, October 20, 1945.  Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Si Romulo habang pinipirmahan ang charter ng United Nations, October 20, 1945. Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Noong 1949, nahalal si Romulo na Pangulo ng ika-apat na General Assembly ng UN.  Sa kanyang unang talumpati dito, kinailangan niyang umupo sa tatlong direktoryo ng telepono upang makila lamang.  Tinawag siyang “Mr. United Nations” dahil sa kanyang popularidad.  Noong Dekada 1950, tinanganan niya ang mga puwestong Kalihim ng Ugnayang Panlabas, Embahador ng Pilipinas sa Washington D.C., Tagapangulo ng UN Security Council.

Nagtatalumpating Romulo habang nakatuntong sa kutson.  Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Nagtatalumpating Romulo habang nakatuntong sa kutson. Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Nang matapos ang karerang diplomatiko, hindi hinayaang magretiro ni Pang. Diosdado Macapagal at hinirang na Pangulo ng Unibersidad ng Pilipinas noong 1962.

Si Romulo kasama ang ilang estudyante sa Quezon Hall bilang Pangulo ng Unibersidad ng Pilipinas.  Mula sa National Geographic.

Si Romulo kasama ang ilang estudyante sa Quezon Hall bilang Pangulo ng Unibersidad ng Pilipinas. Mula sa National Geographic.

Ginawa siyang Kalihim ng Edukasyon at hindi naglaon ay muling nahirang na Kalihim ng Ugnayang Panlabas ni Pangulong Ferdinand E. Marcos.  Naging Ministro ng Ugnayang Panlabas noong 1978 at nagplanong magretiro noong Disyembre 1982.

Karate Kid.  Bilang bahagi ng gabinete ni Pangulong Ferdinand Marcos.  Mula sa Great Lives:  Carlos Romulo.

Karate Kid. Bilang bahagi ng gabinete ni Pangulong Ferdinand Marcos. Mula sa Great Lives: Carlos Romulo.

Ngunit isang taon pa siyang pinilit na magsilbi sa kabila ng kanyang karamdaman.  Sa kanyang pagreretiro noong 14 Enero 1984, walong pangulo na ng Pilipinas ang kanyang napagsilbihan.  Sumakabilang buhay siya noong 15 Disyembre 1985 sa edad na 87 at hinimlay sa Libingan ng mga Bayani sa Fort Bonifacio.

Joaquin, Nick.  1979.  The Seven Ages of Romulo.  Metro Manila:  Filipinas Foundation, Inc.

Romulo, Carlos P.  1998.  The Romulo Reader.  Makati:  The Bookmark, Inc.

Ventura, Sylvia Mendez.  1995.  Carlos P. Romulo.  Makati:  Tahanan Books for Young Readers.

Wells, Evelyn.  1964.  Carlos P. Romulo:  Voice of Freedom.  New York:  Funk and Wagnalls Company, Inc.

XIAOTIME, 14 January 2013: CARLOS P. ROMULO, Kinilala Noon Bilang Mr. Philippines

Broadcast of Xiaotime news segment last Monday, 14 January 2013, at News@1 of PTV 4, simulcast over Radyo ng Bayan DZRB 738 khz AM:

Embahador Carlos P. Romulo, Pangulo ng UN General Assembly

Embahador Carlos P. Romulo, Pangulo ng UN General Assembly

14 January 2013, Monday:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hP35WrmBgDI

Makasaysayang araw po, it’s Xiaotime!  Sa Miyekules, January 16, 2013, pipiliin na ang Miss Tarlac City 2013 para sa pagdiriwang ng pista ng aming bayan sa January 20.  Tutungo po ako doon upang maging isa sa mga hurado.  Suportahan po natin ang piyesta, paanyaya nina Dong Bautista at Cloydy Manlutac.  Sa isa pang bayan sa lalawigan ng Tarlac, sa Camiling, isinilang naman 115 years ago ngayong araw, January 14, 1898, ang isang “Little Giant”—si Heneral Carlos P. Romulo.  Si Heneral Romulo ang maliit na mama na kasama ni Gen. Douglas MacArthur sa makasaysayang larawan na ito ng kanilang pagbabalik sa Leyte noong 1944.

Si Heneral Carlos P. Romulo kasama ni Heneral Douglas MacArthur sa kanilang pagdaong sa Leyte, October 20, 1944.

Si Heneral Carlos P. Romulo kasama ni Heneral Douglas MacArthur sa kanilang pagdaong sa Leyte, October 20, 1944.

Parang bulinggit lang.  Ngunit, hindi man umabot sa tangkad na 5.4, siya ay isa sa mga pinakadakilang Pilipinong lingkod-bayan na lumakad sa mukha ng daigdig, nagsilbi siya sa walong pangulo ng Pilipinas mula kay Manuel Quezon hanggang kay Ferdinand Marcos.

Nagtatalumpating Romulo habang nakatuntong sa kutson.  Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Nagtatalumpating Romulo habang nakatuntong sa kutson. Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Imagine?  Liban sa “Little Giant,” marami pang ibang ikinabit na titulo kay Romulo, para nga siyang isang beauty queen o boksingero.  Si Romulo ay isa mga mga pensionado na nag-aral sa Estados Unidos, nakilala sa galing niyang sumalat at manalumpati.  Naging mamamahayag, propesor ng UP at tagapayo ni Quezon.  Nagwagi ng Pulitzer Prize, ang unang hindi Amerikano na nanalo nito.

Si Romulo, ang "Voice of Freedom" mula sa Corregidor noong 1942.

Si Romulo, ang “Voice of Freedom” mula sa Corregidor noong 1942.  Mula sa Great Lives:  Carlos Romulo.

Naging “Voice of Freedom” ng radyo mula sa Corregidor at nang hirangin ni Quezon na Kalihim ng Impormasyon, dalawang taon niyang inikot ang Estados Unidos upang magsalita sa ngalan ng mga sundalong Pilipino-Amerikano sa Pilipinas—“Remember Freedom.” Nakilala siya bilang “Mr. Philippines.”

Si Carlos P. Romulo habang nagtatalumpati noong Dekada 1940.  Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Si Carlos P. Romulo habang nagtatalumpati noong Dekada 1940. Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Sa sobrang kasikatan niya, naging kinatawan siya ng Pilipinas sa paggawa ng charter ng United Nations (UN), at kasama sa mga unang lumagda sa pagtatatag nito, kahit na hindi pa tayo independent nation noon.  Noong 1949, nahalal si Romulo na Pangulo ng ika-apat na General Assembly ng UN.  Kailangang liwanagin na isang sangay lamang ang General Assembly ng UN at hindi siya naging pinuno, o Secretary General ng buong UN tulad ng napagkakamalian ng iba.  Mataas na posisyon pa rin ito.  Nakaupo siya sa tatlong phonebooks para lamang makita ng madla sa kanyang unang talumpati bilang pangulo.  Tinawag siyang “Mr. United Nations.”

Si Romulo habang pinipirmahan ang charter ng United Nations, October 20, 1945.  Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Si Romulo habang pinipirmahan ang charter ng United Nations, October 20, 1945. Mula sa The Romulo Reader.

Bago magretiro sa diplomatic service, naging embahador pa sa Washington D.C. at Kalihim ng Ugnayang Panlabas.  Ngunit noong 1962, hindi pa rin pinayagan ni Pangulong Diosdado Macapagal na makapagretiro, nahirang na Pangulo ng Unibersidad ng Pilipinas.

Si Romulo kasama ang ilang estudyante sa Quezon Hall bilang Pangulo ng Unibersidad ng Pilipinas.  Mula sa National Geographic.

Si Romulo kasama ang ilang estudyante sa Quezon Hall bilang Pangulo ng Unibersidad ng Pilipinas. Mula sa National Geographic.

Matapos pa nito ay nahirang pa sa ilang pang puwesto sa gabinete, at sa kabila ng kanyang edad, ang balong si Romulo ay nakapangasawa muli ng isang magandang Amerikanang mamamahayag, si Beth Day Romulo!  Tinawag siyang “Karate Kid.”

Walong Pangulo:  Nagsilbi si Romulo sa pamahalaan mula sa panguluhan nina Manuel Quezon...

Walong Pangulo: Nagsilbi si Romulo sa pamahalaan mula sa panguluhan nina Manuel Quezon…

hanggang kay Ferdinand Marcos.  The Real Makoy with the Karate Kid.  Mula sa Great Lives: Carlos Romulo.

…hanggang kay Ferdinand Marcos. The Real Makoy with the Karate Kid. Mula sa Great Lives: Carlos Romulo.

Sumakabilang buhay siya noong 15 Disyembre 1985 sa edad na 87 at hinimlay sa Libingan ng mga Bayani sa Fort Bonifacio.

Si Heneral Carlos P. Romulo habang nakaupo sa kanyang sariling libingan sa Libingan ng mga Bayani.

Si Heneral Carlos P. Romulo habang nakaupo sa kanyang sariling libingan sa Libingan ng mga Bayani.

Bakit ba ang galing niya?  Minsan kanyang sinabi, “I had to be outstanding to prove I was capable not in spite of having been born a Filipino but because I was a Filipino.”  Mr. Philippines, Mr. United Nations, Karate Kid, salamat sa pagsasabing AKO AY PILIPINO, MARANGAL.  Ako po si Xiao Chua para sa Telebisyon ng Bayan, and that was Xiaotime.

(Pook Amorsolo, UP Diliman, 10 January 2013)

XIAOTIME, 4 January 2013: 2012 SA KASAYSAYAN, 2012 SA KASAYSAYAN, Pagkapasa ng Reproductive Health Bill

Broadcast of Xiaotime news segment yesterday, 4 January 2013, at News@1 of PTV 4, simulcast over Radyo ng Bayan DZRB 738 khz AM:

Si Mercy Manlutac, isang health worker sa Tarlac habang nagtuturo ng Reproductive Health sa isang mag-asawa sa Balibago I, Tarlac, Tarlac noong Dekada 1990. Inialay niya ang kanyang buong buhay sa paglilingkod sa bayan. Video grab mula sa Health Worker: Bayani ng Family Planning/ Maternal and Child Health ng Department of Health at ng Japan International Cooperation Agency.

Si Mercy Manlutac, isang health worker sa Tarlac habang nagtuturo ng Reproductive Health sa isang mag-asawa sa Balibago I, Tarlac, Tarlac noong Dekada 1990. Inialay niya ang kanyang buong buhay sa paglilingkod sa bayan. Video grab mula sa Health Worker: Bayani ng Family Planning/ Maternal and Child Health ng Department of Health at ng Japan International Cooperation Agency.

4 January 2013, Friday:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amA1pYzXOXs

Makasaysayang araw po, it’s Xiaotime!  Makasaysayan ang taong nagdaan dahil matapos ang 14 na taon na pagkakatengga, naipasa na ang batas para sa Reproductive Health o Responsible Parenthood.

Ang Camara de Representantes (Mababang Kapulungan ng Kongreso ng Pilipinas), habang pinagbobotohan ang RH Bill, December 17, 2012.

Ang Camara de Representantes (Mababang Kapulungan ng Kongreso ng Pilipinas), habang pinagbobotohan ang RH Bill, December 17, 2012.

Tagumpay ito ng Administrasyong Aquino na ginamit ng tama ang kanyang kapangyarihan upang hikayatin ang dalawang sangay ng Kongreso na magpasa ng isang batas na pinaniniwalaan ng tinatayang pito sa sampung Pilipino na makabubuti.

Pagsasaya ng mga lola sa pagkapasa ng RH Bill.

Pagsasaya ng mga lola sa pagkapasa ng RH Bill.

Gagawin nitong compulsory sa mga lokal na pamahalaan na bigyan ng pagpipilian ang mga mag-asawa kung ano ang hiyang na birth control sa kanila at bibigyan ng nararapat na edukasyon ang bawat mga bata sa bawat baitang ukol sa pagprotekta ng kanilang sekswalidad.  Aminin natin, kung may angkop na kaalaman ang isang bata kung paano alagaan ang kanyang pangangatawan, mas naiiwasan ang mga panlilinlang na nagbubunga ng maagang karanasan sa sex.  Kailangan ring pakinggan ang mga hindi masyadong nasasama sa usapan na sector sa debateng ito na siyang pinakanaaapektuhan:  Ang mga babaeng mahirap na Katoliko, marami sa kanila ang nagpapalaglag na kapag hindi na nila kayang alagaan ang isa pang anak.

08 marami sa kanila ang nagpapalaglag na kapag hindi na nila kayang alagaan ang isa pang anak

Naniniwala ako na mas mababawasan ang abortion kung may tamang kaalaman ang mga mahihirap.  Dekada 1950s pa lamang, isyu na ang population control, family planning at contraception sa Pilipinas.  Naipasa noong 1971 ang Republic Act 6365 o ang Population Act na lalong pinalakas ni Pangulong Ferdinand E. Marcos nang ipataw niya ang Batas Militar sa pamamagitan ng mga Barangay Family Planning Program.

Mula sa "Compassion and Commitment"

Mula sa “Compassion and Commitment”

Muling sumigla ang programa sa panahon ni Pangulong Fidel V. Ramos noong 1992 at ipinaubaya niya ito kay Department of Health Secretary Juan Flavier, naaalala niyo?  Let’s DOH it!

Juan Flavier, obra ng Portraits by Lopez

Juan Flavier, obra ng Portraits by Lopez

Naaalala ko kung paanong ang tita kong health worker na si Mercy Manlutac ay nagkaroon ng todo suporta mula sa pamahalaan nang ipatupad ito sa isang baryo sa Tarlac.  Ngunit sa maraming panahon, ang naging matinding kalaban ng Family Planning Program ay ang Simbahang Katoliko.

Ang mga obispo ng Simbahang Katoliko buhat-buhat ang mga labi ni Jaime Cardinal Sin, 2005.  Ang mahal na Pangulong Gloria Macapagal Arroyo ang naka-itim.

Ang mga obispo ng Simbahang Katoliko buhat-buhat ang mga labi ni Jaime Cardinal Sin, 2005. Ang mahal na Pangulong Gloria Macapagal Arroyo ang naka-itim.

Para sa simbahan, nagsisimula ang buhay ng tao sa pagiging punla pa lamang nito ng lalaki.  Kaya sa Encyclical na Humanae Vitae o “Ukol sa Buhay ng Tao” ni Papa Paul VI, bawal ang kontrasepsyon sapagkat ito ay tila abortion.  Walang katapusang debate kung tama ang kaisipang ito.  Pero para sa akin, may malaking punto ang simbahan na dapat pakinggan.

Papa Paul VI, awtor ng Humanae Vitae.  Humingi siya ng tulong sa isang pilosopo upang isulat ang encyclical na ito, si Karol Cardinal Wojtyla na sumulat ng aklat na "Love and Responsibility."  Siya ang magiging John Paul II.

Papa Paul VI, awtor ng Humanae Vitae. Humingi siya ng tulong sa isang pilosopo upang isulat ang encyclical na ito, si Karol Cardinal Wojtyla na sumulat ng aklat na “Love and Responsibility.” Siya ang magiging John Paul II.

Huwag nating ituring ang sex bilang pangkaraniwang bagay lamang kundi isang sagradong pagbibigayan ng mag-asawa sa isa’t isa sa tamang panahon at tamang lugar.  At kung sobrang population control naman ang gagawin natin, matutulad tayo sa mga bansa sa Europa at Canada, kumokonti ang mga working adults na sumusuporta sa kanilang lumalaking bilang ng matatanda.  Maaaring bumagsak ang pension system kaya sila na mismo ang kumukuha ng migrante.  Kaya harinawa ang Reproductive Health ay magturo sa bayan na mag-anak lamang tayo ng kayang palakihin at pakainin.  Ituro din na huwag naman na hindi na mag-anak.  Harinawa ituro rin sa mga paaralan ang tamang attitude at values sa sekswalidad, at ipaalam sa kabataan ang consequences ng mga bagay na kanilang pinapasok.  Ako po si Xiao Chua para sa Telebisyon ng Bayan, and that was Xiaotime.

(McDo Philcoa, 27 December 2012)

XIAOTIME 22 November 2012: CAMELOT: JFK, Marcos, Aquino

Broadcast of Xiaotime news segment yesterday, 22 November 2012, at News@1 and News@6 of PTV 4, simulcast over Radyo ng Bayan DZRB 738 khz AM:

Ang Frame 313 ng rolyo ng film ni Abraham Zapruder na nagpapakita ng eksaktong saglit ng pagkabaril sa ulo ni Pangulong John F. Kennedy, 12:30 pm ng November 22, 1963 sa Dallas, Texas.

22 November 2012, Thursday:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70vxV9q88IA&feature=plcp

Makasaysayang araw po, it’s Xiaotime!  Alay ang episode na ito sa ating mga kaibigan sa Aquino Center na sina Maris Corpuz, Lina Bernardino, Rodel Tubangi at ang curator nilang si Karen Lacsamana-Carrera.  Where were you when Kennedy was shot?  Ito ang laging tinatanong ng mga Amerikano sa kanilang sarili upang alalahanin ang mga nangyari 49 years ago, ngayong araw, November 22, 1963 sa oras na 12:30 pm sa Dallas, Texas, Estados Unidos.  Nasa motorcade noon si President John F. Kennedy o JFK kasama ang kanyang maybahay na si Jackie nang dalawang bala kumitil sa buhay ng pangulo, ang isa sa bandang likuran at ang huli naman ay sa ulo.

JFK: Busy in bed, but also in Berlin.

Si JFK ang pinakabatang nahalal na pangulo at dating war hero kaya sinalamin niya ang dinamismo ng kanyang panahon at ang magagawa ng bagong henerasyon ng mga Amerikano.  Well lumabas na ngayon na isa siyang babaero, ngunit ika nga, he was busy in bed, but also in Berlin.  Ang Berlin Wall ang sumalamin sa pagkakaalipin ng isang bahagi ng Europa mula sa mga diktadurang komunista.  Mahinahon niyang napigil ang maaaring naging katapusan ng mundo sa loob ng 13 days sa kanyang pakikipagnegosasyon sa mga Komunistang Sobyet noong Cuban Missile Crisis ng 1962.  Gayundin, maaga pa lamang itinaguyod na niya ang civil rights ng mga Aprikanong-Amerikano at inudyok ang pamahalaan niya na sa katapusan ng Dekada 1960 ay makapagpadala ng tao sa buwan.  Nang mamatay si JFK, kinapanayam ang glamorosang si Jackie Kennedy ni Theodore White at kanyang binanggit ang kanta mula sa isang Broadway musical, ang “Camelot,” upang ipaalala ang administrasyon ng kanyang asawa “Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment that was Camelot.”  Maging sa Pilipinas umalingawngaw ang “Camelot,” sa salaming cabinet ng lola ko, lumaki akong nakikita ang larawan ng pamilya Kennedy.

Philippine Camelot: Ang pamilya Marcos noong unang pagpapasinaya, December 30, 1965.

Tatlong taon matapos ang kamatayan ni JFK, tila nagkaroon din tayo ng Philippine Camelot, nang ang Pangulong Marcos ay mahalal kasama ng kanyang glamorosang asawa at mga batang anak, war hero pa!  Ngunit ang mga Aquino rin ay maituturing na dinastiyang minahal ng tao tulad ng mga Kennedy.  Ang trahedya ni JFK ay nangyari din sa kabayanihan at unsolved murder ni Ninoy Aquino noong 1983.  Sa Tuesday, November 27, ipagdiriwang ang 80th birthday ni Ninoy, NINOY@80!

Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

The Aquino Center sa San Miguel, Tarlac City. Kung dadaan ng Subic-Clark-Tarlac Expressway (SCTEX), lumabas sa Hacienda Luisita Exit.

Ang Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum ang isa sa naging inspirasyon ng Aquino Center, isang modernong museo sa San Miguel, Tarlac City na nagkukuwento ng naging karanasan ng mag-asawang Ninoy at Cory Aquino bilang mga pinuno ng bayan.  Dito makikita ang pader ng kulungan ni Ninoy kung saan tinaras niya ang mga araw ng kanyang pagkapiit, ang mga gamit ni Ninoy nang mabaril at ang mga duguang damit niya na patuloy na ipinasuot ng kanyang inang si Doña Aurora noong burol, “Let them see what they did to my son.

“I want them to see what they did to my son…” (Orihinal na poster mula sa Sinupang Xiao Chua, sa kagandahang loob ni G. Linggoy Alcuaz)

Ang mga state gifts ng mga world leaders kay Pangulong Cory na nagpapakita ng pagpapahalaga sa kanya ng daidig at ang iconic niyang simpleng damit nang manumpa na pangulo.

Simpleng dilaw na damit ni Tita Cory pero maganda ang burda hahaha. Ginamit niya ito noong kanyang pagpapasinaya bilang pangulo ng Pilipinas, 25 Pebrero 1986 sa Club Filipino. Makikita ang damit ngayon sa Aquino Center sa Tarlac.

Halina’t bisitahin ang Aquino Center at nang makilala ang dalawang icon na tulad ni JFK ay nag-ambag ng pagsulong ng demokrasyang pandaigdig.  Ang People Power natin ay naging inspirasyon ng pagkalaya mula sa komunismo ng Europa at ng pagbagsak ng Berlin Wall.  Ako po si Xiao Chua para sa Telebisyon ng Bayan, and that was Xiaotime.

(Pook Amorsolo, UP Diliman, 14 November 2012)

XIAOTIME 21 November 2012: TARLAC, KABISERA NG UNANG REPUBLIKA

Broadcast of Xiaotime news segment earlier, 21 November 2012, at News@1 and News@6 of PTV 4, simulcast over Radyo ng Bayan DZRB 738 khz AM:

Ang Altar-Mayor ng Katedral ng Tarlac na may estatwa ni Apung Basti (San Sebastian),1930s. Ito ang sayt ng pagpapatuloy ng Kongreso ng Unang Republika ng Pilipinas, 1899.

21 November 2012, Wednesday:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wK9lWmQHAys&feature=plcp

Makasaysayang araw po, it’s Xiaotime!  Pinababatid ng Pamahalaang Panlungsod ng Tarlac at nina Cloydy Manlutac at Dong Bautista:  Magsaya, kumita at bumili para sa tuloy-tuloy na sigla!  May tiangge sa plazuela ng Tarlac City hanggang December 8!  Lingid sa kaalaman ng marami, ang aking bayang sinilangan, ang Tarlac, Tarlac ay hindi lamang bahagi ng walong sinag ng araw sa ating bandila ng mga unang umaban sa mga Espanyol, naging kabisera din ito ng Republika ng Pilipinas mula June 21, 1899.  113 years ago noong isang linggo, November 12, 1899, bumagsak ang kabiserang ito nang sakupin ng mga Amerikano ang bayan.  Bagama’t hindi gaanong nababanggit, ang pananatili ng Unang Konstitusyunal na Republika sa Asya sa Tarlac ay hindi lamang dapat maging isang “footnote” sa ating kasaysayan, sapagkat dito, maraming nangyaring mahalaga.  Matapos masakop ng mga Amerikano ang kabisera ng Republika sa Malolos, muling nagpulong ang Kongreso sa Katedral ng San Sebastian sa Tarlac noong July 14, 1899.

Katedral ng San Sebastian sa Tarlac, Tarlac (ngayo’y lungsod) sa panahon ng Unang Republika, 1899.

Sa kabila ng tuloy-tuloy na pakikipagbakbakan ng sa mga Amerikano, patuloy na gumawa ng batas ang Kongreso na ayon sa constitutional historian na si Sulpicio Guevarra, “[they] marvelously succeeded in producing order out of chaos.”  Ilan sa isinabatas nila ang mga butaw para sa pagkakasal, ang pagbabawal sa mga barkong nagpapalipad ng bandilang Amerikano, ang pagpapatala ng mga dayuhan, ang pagtatatag ng Korte Suprema at mga hukuman, ang promulgasyon ng General Orders ng Hukbong Katihan o Army.  Sa Tarlac rin itinatag ang Bureau of Paper Money kung saan sa palimbagan ni Zacarias Fajardo inilimbag ang mga mamiso, dos, cinco at beinte pesos.  Sa Gerona, Tarlac naman ginawa ang mga barya sa  Smith, Bell, & Co.

Ang mga perang papel at barya na inilibas ng Unang republika sa Tarlac.

Noong June 30, 1899 binigyan ng amnestiya ang mga huling sundalong Espanyol na sumuko sa Katipunan sa Baler, Aurora at tinawag na mga “amigos” na nagpapatunay hindi lamang ng tapang ng mga Espanyol kundi ng kabutihan ng mga Pilipino.  Nagpapatunay din ito na ang tunay na nagtagumpay sa himagsikan laban sa mga Espanyol ay tayong mga Pilipino.  Ang araw na ito ay ipinagdiriwang ngayon bilang Philippine-Spanish Friendship Day.

Los Ultimos Filipinos, ang mga huling sundalong Espanyol na sumuko sa Katipunan sa Baler, Aurora na nabigyan ng amnestiya mula sa Unang republika sa Tarlac.

Ang Simbahan ng Baler kung saan nagkuta ang Los Ultimos Filipinos, 1899. Sa mga Espanyol, liban sa Maynila, ang Baler ang naaalala nilang lugar kapag naritinig ang pangalang Pilipinas.

Gayundin, ang unang unibersidad na Pilipino, ang Universidad Cientifico-Literaria de Filipinas at ang hayskul na Instituto Burgos mula sa Malolos ayt nagpatuloy sa Kumbento ng Tarlac.  Sa tanging graduation nito noong September 29, 1899, pinirmahan mismo ni Pangulong Aguinaldo ang mga diploma.

Casa Real ng Tarlac, opisina ng panguluhan ni Emilio Aguinaldo, nasa sayt ngayon ng Tarlac State University.

Sa Casa Real ng Tarlac na ngayon ay sayt ng Tarlac State University, nag-opisina si Aguinaldo habang sinusulat ang pinakaunang limbag na tala ukol sa Himagsikan, the True Version of the Philippine Revolution kung saan niya tinuligsa ang mga atrocities o brutalidad ng mga Amerikano sa mga Pilipino.

Ang unang limbag na kwento ng Himagsikan sa perspektibang Pilipino ay isinulat ni Emilio Aguinaldo at isinulat sa Ingles at Espanyol. Maraming mga historyador ang naghinuha na ghost written lamang ito hanggang mahanap ang orihinal sa Tagalog sa sulat kamay ni Aguinaldo.

Ngunit noong November 12, 1899, sa kabila ng pagtatanggol ni Heneral Francisco Makabulos at Heneral Servillano Aquino at ng 400 nilang tauhan, nakuha ni Hen. Arthur MacArthur at ng 3,000 niyang tao ang Tarlac, nagmartsa silang papasok sa bayan, basang-basa sa ulan.

Heneral Francisco Makabulos y Soliman

Heneral Servillano Aquino

Ayon kay Nick Joaquin, sa pagsakop sa Tarlac, “The Republic Had Fallen.”  Tuluyang nahuli si Aguinaldo sa Palanan noong 1901.  Sa pamamagitan ng mga kasaysayang lokal tulad ng mababasa sa bagong aklat na

Kasaysayang Pampook:  Pananaw, Pananaliksik, Pagtuturo ng UP Lipunang Pangkasaysayan, mapapagtanto natin na bawat kwento ng bayan ay mahalaga sa pagbubuo ng isang mas matibay at mapagkaisang pambansang kasaysayan.  Ako po si Xiao Chua para sa Telebisyon ng Bayan, and that was Xiaotime.

(North Conserve, DLSU Manila, 14 November 2012)